Monthly Archives: March 2016

A Safety Message About Slips Trips & Falls, Personal Hygiene, Housekeeping, Fire Hazards (1)

“It Cleans Itself”

We’ve got riding mowers to manicure our lawns. Washing machines and driers for our clothes. Vacuum cleaners for our carpets. But when it comes to washing windows around the house, your only choice is doing it by hand. It’s one of the jobs almost everyone dreads.

But that’s all about to change because enterprising companies have created a dream come true: self-cleaning windows!

Pilkington, a British glassmaker, developed the technology, and they’ve been test-marketing it in Ireland and Australia. Consumers have been enthusiastic, as you’d expect. Japanese companies are said to be hard at work on self-cleaning windows. And in America, PPG Industries has developed its own version of the technology.

How does a self-cleaning window work? The secret is titanium oxide. When water hits ordinary window glass, it beads up and runs off. The dust particles in the water clump together, leaving streaks and spots that make the window look dirty. But self-cleaning windows have an ultra-thin layer of titanium oxide. This layer actually attracts the water, making it run off the window in a continuous sheet. Dirt and dust particles in the water don’t clump together—they simply slide off. But even without water, the windows clean themselves as the titanium oxide causes ultraviolet rays from the sun to break down organic dirt into carbon dioxide and water vapor.

Over 60 million residential windows are sold in the U.S. every year. The potential for self-cleaning windows is huge and the technology is exciting.
But what about the things at work that –unfortunately-don’t clean themselves, like the shop floor, the aisles, the stairs and walkways, the shelves and cabinets, and the storage rooms? Keeping all these areas clean and neat not only shows pride in our work and in our workplace but also plays a critical role in safety. Clutter, grease, oil or other obstructions in walkways can cause slip, trip and fall accidents. Scraps, paper, dust and improperly stored chemicals lying about can start fires. Items sloppily stacked on shelves can fall and hit those walking by.

Cleaner really is safer. As you look around your work area you’ll probably see some areas that could be neater. Yes, until there’s a self-cleaning workplace, housekeeping is up to each of us. Take responsibility to keep your work area clean and clutter-free for you safety.

Clutter Is A Sign
YOUR SAFETY’S ON THE LINE
KEEP YOUR WORK AREA CLEAN!

*Copyright 2008 Harkins Safety


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A Safety Message About Slips Trips & Falls, Tool Safety, Housekeeping, Fire Hazards (1)

“A Clean Sweep”

A World’s Series clean sweep is a special treat for baseball fans. Can you guess how many there have been in baseball history?
The answer is 17. Ten of those victories have gone to American League teams, and seven for National League teams.
Surprisingly, 8 of the 10 American League clean sweeps were accomplished by the New York Yankees. But the very first World Series clean sweep went to the Chicago Cubs.
In the 1907 World Series, the Cubs battled the Detroit Tigers. The first game, called because of darkness after 12 innings, ended in a 3-3 tie. Chicago went on to dominate in game 2, winning 3-1, and in game 3, scoring 5 runs to the Tigers’ 1.
The Tigers fought back in game 4 with a 1-0 lead in the fourth inning when an up-and-comer named Ty Cobb smacked a triple to bring in a run. But the Tigers lost 6-1.
Game 5 was Detroit’s last chance. But Chicago’s ace pitcher Mordecai Brown, threw a seven-hitter and clinched a 2-0 win, giving the Cubs the first-ever World Series clean sweep. It takes lots of hard work and a little luck for a baseball team to end up in the history books with a clean sweep. But you can score a clean sweep every day on the job just by practicing good housekeeping.
*Clean up your act. Sweep floors, clear up clutter, clean up dust and spills, and dispose of waste promptly.
*Get Organized. Put tools and equipment in their proper places, inventory all parts, organize shelves and store all records.
*Avoid slips, trips and falls. Clean or report all spills immediately. Remove debris or other obstructions from stairs and walkways. Fix or report loose carpeting. Never use broken or unstable ladders.
*Spend time on tools. Inspect tools before use, clean when finished and store properly.
*Reduce fire hazards. Dispose of oily rags in proper containers; store chemicals and flammables properly; keep areas free of wood, paper and other combustibles; smoke only in designated areas.
*Practice personal hygiene. Wash hands often. Keep cuts and sores bandaged. Keep hands away from your eyes, nose and mouth. Keep work cloths clean.
Keep Work Areas Clean
Make Housekeeping Your Routine

*Copyright 2003 Harkins Safety


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A Safety Message About Slips Trips & Falls, Tool Safety, Housekeeping, Fire Hazards (2)

“The Magic Kingdom”

Have you ever wondered how the world-famous Walt Disney Magic Kingdom keeps customers clamoring for more year after year? It’s simple. They use a tried and true formula.
The Walt Disney Magic Kingdom in Orlando, Florida depends on the nonstop attention to detail by its employees to keep the magic flowing. The director of the Kingdom says that every employee is a member of the theme park’s cast. Even a host or hostess who takes an order in a restaurant has a speaking role in the theatrical production that is the Magic Kingdom.
Employees are trained to pay attention to the minutest detail as part of the theme park’s passion for creating a satisfying experience for customers. Naturally, good housekeeping is an essential part of everyone’s job.
A network of spacious underground corridors provides support services for the shows, rides and everything that goes on above ground. Giant vacuum tubes near the ceiling carry waste paper to an on-site refuse station. Hazardous wastes like paint and chemicals are disposed of carefully.
These same service corridors house the world’s largest operating wardrobe, a barber shop and a 24-hour hair salon. Without the service corridors, the staff would have to move supplies around above ground, breaking the spell. It would be like pushing a wardrobe cart across the stage in the middle of a Broadway play.
Every worker and every company can benefit from this kind of attention to detail, especially when it comes to housekeeping. Good housekeeping reduces accidents, prevents fires, saves time, increases production and cuts operating costs.
So work the magic of attention to detail by always remembering to…..
*Dispose of waste and trash properly, including flammable liquids and oily or paint-covered rags.
*Wipe up spills immediately.
*Stack boxes and other items neatly and at a reasonable height, away from stairs and traffic areas.
*Pick up tools and other objects that could cause a trip or fall.
*Return equipment to its proper place.
*Make sure fire exits, fire extinguishers, and sprinklers are clearly marked and free of obstructions.
Good housekeeping isn’t magic. It’s just good sense, because accident prevention is good for all of us. All it takes is for employees to stay alert, care about their jobs and care about the customers. That makes our workplace safer for everyone.
Keep It Clean!
Your Work Area Is No Place For An Accident.

*Copyright 2006 Harkins Safety


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