Monthly Archives: November 2016

A Message About Identifying Hazards, Cuts & Lacerations, Slips, Trips & Falls

Safe Harbor

You’ve heard about the Seven Wonders of the World.  But do you know which of the Seven Wonders of the World had a practical use as well as architectural value? This structure, the first of its kind, stood for 1500 years.  It survived three earthquakes and was depicted on a Roman coin.  It outlasted all other structures except the Great Pyramid, which stands today.  Here’s the story.

The Lighthouse of Alexandria, or the Pharos Lighthouse as it was called, was both a marvel and a godsend to ancient mariners. Built in 290 B.C., it is the first recorded lighthouse and it was located on the ancient island of Pharos, founded by Alexander the Great in 332 B.C. It illuminated the harbor as a signal to sailors, using fire at night and reflecting sun rays during the day.  Scientist were amazed by the lighthouse’s mirror, whose reflection could be seen over 35 miles offshore. Legend has it that the mirror was so powerful it could burn enemy ships before they reached the shore.

Architects were awed by the structure’s size.  As tall as a modern 40-story building, the Pharos Lighthouse measured 384 feet, including the foundation, making it the tallest building of its day.

But the sailors navigating the dangerous waters and flat coastline benefited most.  The lighthouse ensured their safe return to the Great Harbor.

Each of us must safely navigate around hundreds of hazards and unexpected situations every day at work, at home and on the road.  It can be demanding, but safety cannot be denied. YOU must decide to work safely-no one can make that decision for you.

Slips, trips and falls; cuts and lacerations; chemical and machine-related injuries; virtually any type of injury you can think of CAN be prevented-if we just take the time to think and act safely.

Develop a sharp, watchful eye for hazards and take steps to eliminate them, both on and off the job. Accidents, like dangerous waters are unexpected and unwanted.  Hazards can take you by surprise, but just like a ship’s captain who pilots his craft with care and skill, with planning and attention, you can identify and avoid hazards if and when they do occur.

When you take the responsibility for safety, you will reap the rewards.

Remember Safety Depends On You

*Copyright 2005 Harkins Safety     B-191

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A Message About Teamwork, Attitude, Mobile Equipment Safety Training

Blue Angels

If the sight of jets thundering through the skies at 600 mph while performing intricate aerial maneuvers in tight formation quickens your pulse, chances are you’re witnessing one of the most spectacular feats of flying ever staged.

You’re watching the U.S. Navy Blue Angels.

A Blue Angels air show features perfectly timed, perfectly choreographed precision flying, such as the Four-Plane Diamond Formation. This magnificent event is accented with two solo pilots in stunning aerial acrobatics. A solo vertical roll can reach as high as 15,000 feet.  In the Sneak pass, the pilot streaks by at just 50 feet above the ground. But the pinnacle of precision flying comes when the Blue Angels perform the intricate maneuvers of the renowned Six-Jet Delta Formation while locked together as one beautifully functioning unit.

True it takes years of training, but teamwork is the key.

What does it take to be a Blue Angel? Each year, a total of 16 officers volunteer, three tactical pilots, two support officers and one Marine pilot are selected to relieve departing members. The Blue Angels Commanding Officer, the Boss must have at least 3,000 tactical jet-fighting hours and experience commanding a squadron. Other members must have a minimum of 1,250 tactical jet-fighter hours. The team trains and performs together for maximum precision and safety.

The Blue Angels rely on safety and teamwork for every demonstration.  Safety is just as important to you and it also depends on teamwork.  Whether you’re flying in formation or operating a forklift, safety is no accident-it requires skill and training and cooperation.

     *Look out for the other guy or gal.  Always stay aware of who’s working around you and what they’re doing.  If you see a coworker attempting an unsafe act, say something.

     *Offer help when you can.  Lending a hand makes the work easier and safer, so help others whenever possible.  For safety’s sake, ask for help when you need it, too.

     *Stay cool.  Frustrations can arise when working with others, but don’t let anger prod you into doing something dangerous.  Remember, you’re a professional.  What would happen if one of the Blue Angels lost his cool?  The consequences for you can be just as deadly.

The Blue Angels perform nearly 70 air shows at 34 locations to the delight of more than 17 million amazed spectators. Since they started in 1946, that’s more than 381 million fans.  When you work safely every day, you come home to the most important fans of all-your family.

TEAMWORK

SAFETY Is No Accident

Copyright 2006 Harkins Safety   B-177

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