Seat Belts

A Safety Message About Commercial Driving Safety, Seat Belts & Attitude (2)

“The Thousand Miles”

All of Italy turns out every year for the Mille Miglia, one of the most exciting car races in motor sport. It is a celebration of tradition, passion and speed. It is where marques like Alfa Romeo, Maserati, Ferrari and Porsche made their legends. But it is also marked by tragedy.

The Mille Miglia, which means “The Thousand Miles” in Italian, was established by two wealthy racing enthusiasts who decided to create their own motorcar race when the Italian Grand Prix was yanked from their hometown of Brescia. They chose a course from Brescia to Rome and back, a distance of 1,000 Roman miles. The first race in 1927 had 75 starters, all Italian and the winner finished in under 21 hours.

The cars in the Mille Miglia were started in one-minute intervals. But the drivers were daring, and racing was dangerous.

In the 1930 Mille Miglia, Tazio Nuvolari drove like a demon to pass every car in sight. When he caught the last challenger, he turned off his headlights to remain undetected, followed the leader’s taillights, then shot ahead to win.

Nuvolari’s maneuver may have paid off on the racetrack but it wouldn’t be worth the risk in everyday traffic. Instead, when you’re behind the wheel:

  • Obey all the rules of the road.
  • Be alert to constantly changing traffic and road conditions.
  • Leave yourself extra braking distance when driving large vehicles.
  • Always wear your seat belt and insist that passengers do as well.
  • Make sure that your vehicle is safe to operate.
  • Don’t take chances-it isn’t worth risking an accident that could injure you or someone else.

Always follow the rules and go the extra mile for safety and you’ll have many accident- free years down the road.

In the 1957 Mille Miglia, a fatal crash took the lives of a driver, his co-driver and 11 spectators in the Italian village of Guidizzolo. It was caused by a blown tire, later found to be defective.

The Mille Miglia resumed one year after that fatal crash, but as a road rally for classic pre-1957 cars, not an all-out race. Renamed the Mille Miglia Storica, it draws historic car lovers from all over the world to this day.

Remember that you’re in the race for the long run. Use your safety smarts, keep a cool head, stop and think and always…

GO THE EXTRA MILE FOR SAFETY

Drive Defensively,

Stay Alert, Use Seat Belts

* Copyright 2006 Harkins Safety


Safe Driving Safety Banners

Categories:

A Safety Message About Commercial Driving Safety, Seat Belts & Attitude (1)

“Speed Kills; Safety Saves”

Barreling into the banked corner at the Daytona 500, Dale Earnhardt the legendary No. 3, smashed head-on into the wall in one of the most tragic crashed in NASCAR history. Earnhardt was killed instantly. Ironically it was the final lap of the race.

In fourth place at the time Earnhardt entered that fateful turn at 180 mph when he grazed the car beside him. Earnhardt’s car swerved sharply to the right and was hit broadside by yet another car, catapulting Earnhardt on into the wall. As horrified fans gasped, the rescue teams sprang into action. But it was too late.

In the aftermath of the accident, a $1 million investigation raised questions but revealed little. Some claimed that Earnhardt’s seatbelt ripped apart in the crash. His head hit either the steering wheel or the support behind the seat and the impact killed him. Others said Earnhardt’s crew didn’t fit the belt properly before the race. Still others insisted that the head-and-neck restraint, which Earnhardt didn’t like to use, would have saved his life.

Whatever the reason, Earnhardt, known as the Intimidator for his aggressive driving style, had reached the end of an illustrious career. No more trophies, no more Winner’s Circle. It remains a tragic loss.

Race car driving is a dangerous game, but so is everyday driving on our nation’s highways if you fail to follow the rules of safe driving.

  • Stay alert for road signs. Traffic signs are there for your safety; use them.
  • Anticipate changing conditions. Traffic patterns change constantly. Sudden rain, snow or fog could threaten safety within minutes. Expect the unexpected.
  • Wear safety belts. It’s not only a good idea, it’s the law.
  • Don’t drink and drive. Alcohol and drugs impair judgement and reduce reaction time.
  • Beware of big vehicles. Trucks and other large vehicles require greater breaking distance and are more prone to tipovers if turned sharply. Keep that in mind when you’re driving larger vehicles or driving with them on the highways. And always use extra caution around school buses.
  • Don’t tailgate. It’s unsafe and discourteous. Drive friendly.
  • Allow enough following distance for traffic and road conditions.
  • Avoid road rage. Anger has no place behind the wheel. Stay cool, stay safe.

WATCH FOR WARNING SIGNS AND DRIVE SAFELY!

* Copyright 2002 Harkins Safety


SAFE DRIVING SAFETY BANNERS

Categories:

***ALL RIGHTS RESERVED ***. NO PART OF ANY AND ALL HARKINS SAFETY COPYRIGHTED PRODUCTS MAY BE REPRODUCED IN ANY FORM OR BY ANY MEANS WHETHER MECHANICAL, PHOTOGRAPHIC OR ELECTRONIC PROCESS OR IN THE FORM OF A PHONOGRAPHIC RECORDING, NOR MAY IT BE STORED IN A RETRIEVABLE SYSTEM, TRANSMITTED, OR OTHERWISE FOR PUBLIC OR PRIVATE USE. REPRODUCTION IS STRICTLY PROHIBITED, NO EXCEPTIONS

Keeping People Safe Since 1947

Toll Free: (888) 962-3300

6206 Kahler Hill Rd
Little Valley, New York 14755

Phone (716) 938-9300

Fax (716) 938-9301

We are located in the EASTERN time zone.
M-F 8AM-5PM EST