Mobile Equipment

A Message About Prevention Of Slips Trips & Falls, Ladder Safety

Three Wheel’in

Is it a car? Is it a motorcycle? Actually it’s a bit of both. One of the most popular vehicles for both families and sporting drivers, the Morgan was a revolution when it first leapt onto the automotive scene.

The Morgan Motor Company was founded in 1909. The first cars the company made were three-wheelers with two wheels in front and one in back. They were powered by motorcycle engines, with a chain driving the rear wheel and they came in two-seat and four-seat models.

Morgan’s first design, introduced at the 1911 Olympia Motor Exhibition, was a two-seater. It came with either a single-cylinder or a twin motorcycle engine, usually a British-made JAP engine.

Since the three-wheelers were classified as motorcycles by the British government, they were exempt from the tax on cars. This made them very attractive to buyers.

Could you imagine driving a three-wheeler? You might think it would be unstable compared to a four-wheeled car, but the three wheels with the two widely spaced wheels at front provided surprising stability.  It’s the same idea as maintaining three points of contact when you’re climbing up or down at work.

When you’re on a ladder, stairs, the steps of a truck or other mobile equipment-anytime you’re climbing up or down-always remember that it takes three for stability. Keep three points of contact-two feet and one hand, or two hands and one foot-with the ladder or steps. That way, you can be sure to avoid any slip and fall accidents and the sometimes serious injuries they cause. Falls from ladders and steps are some of the most common accidents. That’s too bad because they’re easy to avoid, just by keeping three points of contact.

Three points of contact- not a bad idea. It certainly served Morgan well. As their success grew, new models appeared. In 1932 Morgan introduced the F-4, which used a pressed-steel chassis and a four-cylinder Ford side-valve engine.

Even though their production ceased in 1952, Morgan three-wheelers continue to delight car fans. Low-slung Morgans with hopped-up competition engines thrill crowds at vintage car races with their speed and brilliant handling.

Let the Morgan three-wheeler remind you of the stability you gain when you keep three points of contact when climbing up or down. It’s a simple thing, but one that could spare you from a potentially serious injury. Why not get revved up about safety?

IT TAKES 3 FOR STABILITY!

TO PREVENT FALLS KEEP 3 POINTS OF CONTACT WHEN YOU CLIMB UP OR DOWN

*Copyright 2006 Harkins Safety B248

2248_3Points_GT.ai

Categories:

A Message About Mobile Equipment Safety

Bigfoot

The name Bob Chandler might not mean anything to you, but you probably know his creation. It’s the meanest 4×4 truck anywhere.  It’s the show-stopping monster truck Bigfoot.

It all began in the mid 1970’s. Bob Chandler, a construction contractor, used his Ford pick-up truck on the job and for recreation. But when parts broke due to hard use, he often couldn’t find sturdier replacements. That led him to open Midwest Four Wheel Drive & Performance Center.

Partly to promote his new business, Chandler set out to make his truck bigger and stronger, with huge tires and a sky high suspension lift. In 1979, the truck with its jaw-dropping rear-wheel steering, appeared at a Denver car show, its first paid event. Truck pulls in arenas and stadiums soon followed, where Bigfoot was often the star of the show.

At a truck pull in 1981, Chandler tried something just for fun. He drove his beefed up 4×4 over two junk cars. The crowd went wild. He later duplicated the stunt at a stadium show, and in 1983 he began a sponsorship with Ford Motor Company. The legend of Bigfoot was born.

Through the 80s and 90s, Bigfoot got bigger, with massive 66” tires and a 572 cubic inch engine that pumps out 1,500 horsepower and 1,300 foot/pounds of torque. In truck pulls across the country, Bigfoot is always the crowd favorite, especially with Chandler behind the wheel.

Just like the driver of a monster truck, when you’re behind the wheel or at the controls of a forklift, crane, tractor or other mobile equipment. Remember that safety depends on you. Always carry loads properly. Operate the equipment at a safe speed. Keep your view unobstructed. Most important, stay alert for pedestrians—they have the right of way. When you operate mobile equipment, safety is your responsibility, a rule that Chandler follows himself.

Whether he’s racing or doing stunts, Chandler drives to win, but he always considers safety. In 1987, he founded the Monster Truck Racing Association, created solely to promote safety in the monster truck industry. He knows what’s at stake. That’s why he always thinks safety behind the wheel. You should too.

Forklifts and other mobile equipment are great labor saving devices, but with benefits come risks. Minimize and eliminate risk by knowing the rules, by sticking to your safety plan every time you operate equipment and by making safety a driving force every day.

CAUTION: MOBILE EQUIPMENT

OPERATORS TAKE CARE PEDESTRIANS STAY AWARE

*Copyright 2008 Harkins Safety (B235)

2235_Mobile_GT.ai

Categories:

A Message About Teamwork, Attitude, Mobile Equipment Safety Training

Blue Angels

If the sight of jets thundering through the skies at 600 mph while performing intricate aerial maneuvers in tight formation quickens your pulse, chances are you’re witnessing one of the most spectacular feats of flying ever staged.

You’re watching the U.S. Navy Blue Angels.

A Blue Angels air show features perfectly timed, perfectly choreographed precision flying, such as the Four-Plane Diamond Formation. This magnificent event is accented with two solo pilots in stunning aerial acrobatics. A solo vertical roll can reach as high as 15,000 feet.  In the Sneak pass, the pilot streaks by at just 50 feet above the ground. But the pinnacle of precision flying comes when the Blue Angels perform the intricate maneuvers of the renowned Six-Jet Delta Formation while locked together as one beautifully functioning unit.

True it takes years of training, but teamwork is the key.

What does it take to be a Blue Angel? Each year, a total of 16 officers volunteer, three tactical pilots, two support officers and one Marine pilot are selected to relieve departing members. The Blue Angels Commanding Officer, the Boss must have at least 3,000 tactical jet-fighting hours and experience commanding a squadron. Other members must have a minimum of 1,250 tactical jet-fighter hours. The team trains and performs together for maximum precision and safety.

The Blue Angels rely on safety and teamwork for every demonstration.  Safety is just as important to you and it also depends on teamwork.  Whether you’re flying in formation or operating a forklift, safety is no accident-it requires skill and training and cooperation.

     *Look out for the other guy or gal.  Always stay aware of who’s working around you and what they’re doing.  If you see a coworker attempting an unsafe act, say something.

     *Offer help when you can.  Lending a hand makes the work easier and safer, so help others whenever possible.  For safety’s sake, ask for help when you need it, too.

     *Stay cool.  Frustrations can arise when working with others, but don’t let anger prod you into doing something dangerous.  Remember, you’re a professional.  What would happen if one of the Blue Angels lost his cool?  The consequences for you can be just as deadly.

The Blue Angels perform nearly 70 air shows at 34 locations to the delight of more than 17 million amazed spectators. Since they started in 1946, that’s more than 381 million fans.  When you work safely every day, you come home to the most important fans of all-your family.

TEAMWORK

SAFETY Is No Accident

Copyright 2006 Harkins Safety   B-177

2177J

Categories:

***ALL RIGHTS RESERVED ***. NO PART OF ANY AND ALL HARKINS SAFETY COPYRIGHTED PRODUCTS MAY BE REPRODUCED IN ANY FORM OR BY ANY MEANS WHETHER MECHANICAL, PHOTOGRAPHIC OR ELECTRONIC PROCESS OR IN THE FORM OF A PHONOGRAPHIC RECORDING, NOR MAY IT BE STORED IN A RETRIEVABLE SYSTEM, TRANSMITTED, OR OTHERWISE FOR PUBLIC OR PRIVATE USE. REPRODUCTION IS STRICTLY PROHIBITED, NO EXCEPTIONS

Keeping People Safe Since 1947

Toll Free: (888) 962-3300

6206 Kahler Hill Rd
Little Valley, New York 14755

Phone (716) 938-9300

Fax (716) 938-9301

We are located in the EASTERN time zone.
M-F 8AM-5PM EST